Molecular Interaction Studies on Binary Liquid Mixture of Ethyl Oleate and Ethyl Methyl Ketone at Temperature Range from 303.15K to 318.15K

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Molecular Interaction Studies on Binary Liquid Mixture of Ethyl Oleate and Ethyl Methyl Ketone at Temperature Range from 303.15K to 318.15K

D. Chinnarao1, Ch .V Padmarao2, K. Raja1, Srilatha.M1, B. Venkateswara Rao1

1 Department of Engineering Chemistry, AU College of Engineering (A), Visakhapatnam, India.

2 Department of Chemistry, Adikavi Nannaya University, Rajamahendravaram.

1 Research Mentor, Department of Engineering Chemistry, AU College of Engineering (A), Visakhapatnam, India, 530003.

Abstract: Density (), ultrasonic velocities (u) and dynamic viscosity () for binary mixture of Ethyl oleate with Ethyl methyl ketone is experimented at ambient temperature range from 303.15K to 318.15K at atmospheric pressure over various compositions. The density () and viscosity () are calibrated using Specific gravity bottle and Ostwalds glass capillary viscometer respectively. The velocity (U) is measured using ultrasonic interferometer. The thermo dynamic parameters such as internal pressure (i), free volume (Vf), Molar volume (Vm) and acoustical parameters such as adiabatic compressibility (), inter molecular free length (Lf), acoustic impedance (z), relaxation time () and their excess parameters have been calculated.

Keywords: Ultrasonic velocity, density, viscosity, adiabatic compressibility, free volume, internal pressure, molecular interactions.

INTRODUCTION

In our earlier investigations, [1-2] we made an attempt by making use of an ultrasonic technique to explore the behavior of some of the amino acids as well as in organic liquid mixtures. In recent years much effort has been made with measurement and interpretation of the ultrasonic properties of liquids and liquid mixtures. The ultrasonic studies are of great importance in helping to understand the nature and extent of the patterns of molecular aggregation that exist in liquid mixtures, resulting from intermolecular interactions [3-4].There has been an increasing interest in the study of systems comprising of unlike components with interactions of varying type. The sign and magnitude of excess parameters have been used to investigate the interactions between the components of a system [5-7].

Molecular interactions are interactions between electrically neutral molecules or atoms. Other than atomic bonds these are electrical in nature and consist of attractive forces (orientation, induction, and dispersion forces) and repulsive forces. Molecular interaction first taken into consideration by J. D. van der Waals (1873) in explaining the properties of real gases and liquids. These depend on the distance between the molecules and usually are described by the potential energy of interaction. Studies on liquid- liquid mixtures either binary, ternary or more has importance of its own in various fields of con temporal civilized societies like chemical engineering, food processing, preparation of cosmetics, polymer paints and cleansing agents, petroleum, edible and non edible oil, preparation of bio diesel etc. Ultrasonic waves have their extensive applications in various fields like nondestructive tests for solids and liquids in medical and engineering, food processing, pharmaceutical, polymer and chemicals, metallurgical industries etc. It will be an advantageous tool if these two fields were combined for conducting studies on inter and intra particulate behavior. Ultrasonic investigations of binary mixtures have been taking place since decades by so many scholars under various heads like acoustic, thermodynamic, molecular interactions etc. The thermodynamic studies of binary liquid mixtures have attracted much attention of research scholars and scientists, and experimental data on number systems are available from review and publication [8-12]. Ultrasonic investigation of liquid mixtures consisting polar and non-polar components is of considerable importance in understanding intermolecular interaction between the component molecules and they find applications in a number of industrial and technological processes. Many investigations [13-18] have been employed in the task of collecting more and more data and explaining in terms of the properties of pure liquid. In the present paper the author submitting part of the studies as the effect of temperature and concentration on ultrasonic velocity(v) of 2MHz wave in the pure and mixtures of two organic liquids Ethyl Oleate and Ethyl Methyl Ketone at various temperatures 303.15K, 308.15K, 313.15K and 318.15K. The effects on density (), viscosity (), Adiabatic compressibility (ad), Inter molecular free length (Lf) and Internal pressure (i) also were studied. Results were tabulated and the relations among the mentioned parameters were represented as Graph.1-24.

MATERIALS AND EXPERIMENTS

All the materials procured are of Sigma-Aldrich AR grade and glassware used of Borosilicate make. Organic liquids Ethyl Oleate and Ethyl Methyl Ketone were procured are used directly without any purification. The densities and viscosities of the liquid compounds were measured with specific gravity bottle and Ostwald viscometer pre calibrated with 3D [19] water of

Millipore to nearest mg/ml. The time taken for flow of viscous fluid in Ostwald viscosity meter is measured to a nearest 0.01 sec. Borosilicate glassware, Japan make Shimadzu electronic balance of sensitivity +0.001gm and constant temperature water bath of accuracy +0.1K were used while conducting the experiments. 2MHz ultrasonic interferometer model no. F-05 with least count of digital micrometer 0.001mm of Mittal Enterprises [20] was used for calculating velocities of sound waves and all the tests were conducted as per ASTM standard [21] procedures. The 30ml of binary mixtures of Ethyl Oleate and Ethyl Methyl Ketone were prepared with variable volumes of 5ml each to conduct the experiments from which the mole fractions were calculated [22].

THEORY AND CALCULATIONS

In order to examine the inter molecular interactions in liquid mixtures of Ethyl Oleatae with Ethyl Methyl Ketone, experiments were conducted to find the density, viscosity and velocity of 2MHz ultrasonic waves for pure liquids and for binary liquid mixtures. The results of pure liquids are compared with literature values for assessment. From the experimental data of binary mixtures, the derived and excess values were calculated at various mole fractions of Ethyl Oleatae for understanding the inter and intra molecular interactions at each temperature. The derived and excess values are calculated by using the fallowing relations.

Adiabatic compressibility (ad)

Adiabatic compressibility the parameter which represents the ability to change volume of a liquid sample is

= ( 2)1 .. (1)

Intermolecular free length (Lf)

The formula for outer to outer distance between the interacting molecules

= (2)

Molar volume of the binary liquid mixture (Vm)

The molar volume of the system at every mole fraction for the mixture is given by

Vm=Meff /mix where Meff =M1 X1 +M2 X2 /(X1+X2) ..(3)

Free volume (Vf)

The free volumes of the binary mixtures have been computed using its relationship with the ultrasonic velocity and viscosity as given below

3

= ()2

 

.(4)

Where k is a constant, which is independent of temperature and its value is 4.28 X 109 for all liquids.

Specific acoustic impedance (Z)

The ultrasonic velocity is influenced by the acoustic impedance (Z), which is given by the relation

Z = U .(5)

EXCESS THERMODYNAMIC PARAMETERS

With the help of exces parameters the extent of deviation from the ideal behavior of binary mixture can be estimated. The difference between the thermodynamic function of mixing for a real system and the value corresponding to a perfect solution at the same temperature, pressure and composition is called the thermodynamic excess function, denoted by YE.

Excess value YE for each parameter can compute by using the general formula

YE = Y – (Y1 X1+Y2 X2) (6)

Where Y is the parameter under consideration, X1 and X2 are mole fractions of two liquids Ethyl Oleate and other organic compound under consideration respectively of the binary system, Ethyl Methyl Ketone here and E represent excess.

Deviation in adiabatic compressibility (ad)

The difference of the adiabatic compressibility of the mixture and the sum of the fractional contributory adiabatic compressibilitys of the two liquids individually is the deviation in adiabatic compressibility. At a given mole fraction it is given by

Excess free length (LfE)

The excess free length can be calculated with formula

Excess acoustic impudence (ZE)

ad = ad (ad1 X1+ ad2 X2) . (7)

Lf E=Lf (Lf1 X1+Lf2 X2) (8)

Excess acoustic impedance can be calculated by the relation

ZE=Z-(Z1 X1+Z2 X2) (9)

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

Velocities of 2MHz ultrasonic wave, densities and viscosities of pure Ethyl Oleate and Ethyl Methyl Ketone were measured with pre calibrated interferometer, specific gravity bottle and Ostwald viscometer respectively in the temperature range of 303.15K to 318.15K. The results were compared with available literature and shown in table.1 and table.2. The experimental

values of density (), viscosity () and speed of sound (u) for all the mixtures over the entire range of composition and at 303.15K, 308.15K, 313.15K and 318.15 K are presented in table3, table4 and table5.

Table.1. Comparison of experimental and literature values of density (), viscosity () and velocity (U) of 2MHz ultrasonic wave of pure Ethyl oleate

Parameter 303.15K 308.15K 313.15K 318.15K
Expt. Lite. Expt. Lite. Expt. Lite. Expt. Lite.
Density() kg/m3 863.54 863.20[23] 859.32 859.50[23] 855.56 855.80[23] 852.10 855.20[23]
Viscosity () Ns/m2 5.3100 5.3094[23] 4.7164 4.7156[23] 4.2165 4.2137[23] 3.6698 3.7876[23]
Velocity (U) m/s 1368.16 1360.67[24] 1340.78 1342.98[24] 1324.02 1325.49[24] 1305.04 1308.17[24]

Table.2. Comparison of experimental and literature values of density (), viscosity () and velocity (U) of 2MHz ultrasonic wave for pure Ethyl methyl ketone

Parameter 303.15K 308.15K 313.15K 318.15K
Expt. Lite. Expt. Lite. Expt. Lite. Expt. Lite.
Density () kg/m3 794.3 794.0[25] 789.6 788.8[26]

784.6[29]

783.2 783.1[27] 777.4 778.5[28]
Viscosity () Ns/m2 0.3690 0.362[26] 0.3460 0.346[27] 0.3351 0.330[28] 0.3170 0.316[28]
Velocity (U) m/s 1171.6 1170.6[30] 1154.9 1153.8[26] 1122.6 1120.4[30] 1097.8 1096.4[26]

Table.3. Ultrasonic Velocity (U), Density (), Viscosity (), Adiabatic Compressibility (ad), Inter Molecular Free Length (Lf), Molar Volume (Vm), Raos Constant(R), Wadas Constant (W) for Binary Mixture Of Ethyl Oleate and Ethyl Methyl Ketone at different temperatures.

Mole fraction (X1) Mole fraction (X2) Velocity m/sec (U) Density Kg/m3 () Viscosity Nsm-2 () Ad. Comp. 10-10

N-1.m2

(ad)

Int. Mol. Free length 10-10 m

(Lf)

Mol. Vol. (Vm) RaosConstn t

(R)

Wadas Constant (W)
T= 303.15 K
0.0000 1.0000 1171.6 794.3 0.369 9.1718 6.2841 90.781 4.4421 6.6145
0.0480 0.9519 1204.36 805.84 1.1925 8.5553 6.0692 103.7 5.1211 7.6314
0.1120 0.8879 1237.12 817.38 2.016 7.9937 5.8667 120.91 6.0246 8.9845
0.2017 0.7984 1269.88 828.92 2.8395 7.4810 5.6754 144.96 7.2864 10.874
0.3351 0.6645 1302.64 840.46 3.663 7.0118 5.4945 180.97 9.1737 13.702
0.5797 0.442 1335.4 852 4.4865 6.5816 5.3233 240.77 12.307 18.395
1.0000 0.0000 1368.16 863.54 5.31 6.1864 5.1610 359.59 18.529 27.717
T=308.15 K
0.0000 1.0000 1154.9 789.6 0.346 9.4952 6.4556 91.321 4.4472 6.621
0.0481 0.9519 1185.88 801.22 1.0744 8.875 6.2412 104.31 5.1249 7.6363
0.1122 0.8878 1216.86 812.84 1.8028 8.3083 6.0387 121.61 6.0265 8.9872
0.2017 0.7983 1247.84 824.46 2.5312 7.7896 5.8471 145.8 7.2856 10.874
0.3357 0.6643 1278.82 836.08 3.2596 7.3136 5.6657 181.98 9.1685 13.696
0.5582 0.4418 1309.8 847.7 3.988 6.8762 5.4936

/td>

242.06 12.293 18.378
1.0000 0.0000 1340.78 859.32 4.7164 6.4734 5.3303 361.36 18.495 27.673
T=313.15 K
0.0000 1.0000 1122.6 1122.6 0.3351 10.132 6.7321 92.067 4.4413 6.6136
0.0483 0.9517 1156.17 1156.1 0.982 9.4069 6.4869 105.15 5.1223 7.6336
0.1126 0.8874 1189.74 1189.7 1.6289 8.7508 6.2566 122.56 6.0277 8.99
0.2023 0.7977 1223.31 1223.3 2.2758 8.1553 6.0399 146.88 7.2912 10.883
0.3366 0.6634 1256.88 1256.8 2.9227 7.6134 5.8358 183.24 9.1787 13.711
0.5591 0.4409 1290.45 1290.4 3.5696 7.1192 5.6432 243.53 12.306 18.398
1.0000 0.0000 1324.02 1324.0 4.2165 6.6675 5.4612 362.95 18.499 27.678
T=318.15 K
0.0000 1.0000 1097.8 777.4 0.317 10.673 6.9751 92.754 4.4413 6.6135
0.0484 0.9515 1132.34 789.85 0.8758 9.8741 6.7089 105.91 5.124 7.6362
0.1128 0.8871 1166.88 802.3 1.4346 9.1539 6.4596 123.42 6.0313 8.9955
0.2028 0.7971 1201.42 814.75 1.9934 8.5032 6.2257 147.87 7.2965 10.891
0.3373 0.6626 1235.96 827.2 2.5522 7.9137 6.006 184.4 9.1851 13.722
0.5599 0.4400 1270.5 839.65 3.111 7.3782 5.7993 244.88 12.311 18.406
1.0000 0.0000 1305.04 852.1 3.6698 6.8906 5.6044 364.42 18.485 27.66

Table.4.Freee Volume (Vf), Acoustic Impedance (Z), Internal Pressure(),Gibbs Energy (GE), Enthalpy(H) and Relaxation Time() for binary mixture of Ethyl Oleate and Methyl ketone at different temperatures.

Mole fraction (X1) Mole fraction (X2) Free Volume (Vf) Acoustic Impedance (Z) Internal pressure () Gibbs Energy (GE) Enthalpy (H) Relaxation time ()
T=303.15 K
0.0000 1.0000 3.9109 0.9306 341.26 0.1065 30.980 0.45125
0.0480 0.9519 0.8753 0.9705 514.36 0.11062 53.339 1.3603
0.1120 0.8879 0.5332 1.0112 547.74 0.11232 66.227 2.14873
0.2017 0.7984 0.4448 1.0526 515.58 0.11335 74.7412 2.83232
0.3351 0.6645 0.4491 1.0948 443.26 0.11406 80.217 3.4246
0.5797 0.442 0.5386 1.1378 344.89 0.11458 83.039 3.93717
1.0000 0.0000 0.8079 1.1815 230.59 0.11498 82.919 4.38003
T=308.15 K
0.0000 1.0000 4.2155 0.9119 336.99 0.1082 30.775 0.438
0.0481 0.9519 1.0003 0.9502 498.14 0.1122 51.962 1.2714
0.1122 0.8878 0.6153 0.9891 528.76 0.114 64.305 1.9971
0.2017 0.7983 0.515 1.0288 497.19 0.115 72.488 2.6289
0.3357 0.6643 0.5207 1.0692 427.31 0.1157 77.763 3.1786
0.5582 0.4418 0.6246 1.1103 332.51 0.1163 80.487 3.6563
1.0000 0.0000 0.9364 1.1522 222.42 0.1167 80.374 4.0708
T=313.15 K
0.0000 1.0000 4.2386 0.8792 339.99 0.1102 31.302 0.4527
0.0483 0.9517 1.1028 0.9195 487.43 0.114 51.251 1.2317
0.1126 0.8874 0.6936 0.9605 513.67 0.1157 62.954 1.9006
0.2023 0.7977 0.5874 1.0024 481.2 0.1167 70.677 2.4747
0.3366 0.6634 0.5987 1.045 412.6 0.1174 75.604 2.9669
0.5591 0.4409 0.7225 1.0885 320.61 0.1179 78.076 3.3884
1.0000 0.0000 1.087 1.1328 214.44 0.1183 77.83

</td

3.7484
T=318.15 K
0.0000 1.0000 4.45496 0.8534 338.053 0.11196 31.3558 0.45114
0.0484 0.9515 1.26994 0.8944 470.176 0.11563 49.7979 1.15304
0.1128 0.8871 0.81607 0.9362 492.017 0.11727 60.7266 1.75098
0.2028 0.7971 0.69855 0.9789 459.376 0.11827 67.9284 2.26006
0.3373 0.6626 0.71673 1.0224 393.13 0.11895 72.4913 2.69299
0.5599 0.4400 0.86871 1.0668 305.182 0.11945 74.7335 3.06049
1.0000 0.0000 1.31007 1.112 204.169 0.11983 74.4032 3.37165

Table.5. Excess Velocity, Excess Adiabatic Compressibility (ad), Excess Inter Molecular Free Length (Lfe), Excess Impedance

E E E

(ZE), Excess Molar Volume (Vm ), Excess Free Volume(Vf ), Excess Viscosity (),Excess internal pressure (

), Excess Gibbs

Energy(GE), Excess Enthalpy (HE) for binary mixture of Ethyl oleate and Ethyl Methyl ketone at different temperatures.

(X1) UE ad Lf E ZE V E

m

VfE E GE HE
T=303.15 K
0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000
0.0480 23.312 -0.473 -0.1609 0.0278 -0.0608 -2.8864 0.58602 178.41 0.0280 19.862
0.1120 43.489 -0.8435 -0.2916 0.0528 -0.1415 -3.0299 1.09321 218.88 0.0386 29.425
0.2017 58.659 -1.0891 -0.3823 0.0714 -0.2423 -2.8407 1.47455 196.62 0.0426 33.291
0.3351 65.092 -1.1584 -0.4128 0.0800 -0.4427 -2.4207 1.63626 139.13 0.0410 31.810
0.5797 54.126 -0.9244 -0.3341 0.0671 -0.3341 -1.6409 1.36059 65.377 0.0306 23.0784
1.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000
T=308.15 K
0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000
0.0481 22.037 -0.4748 -0.1603 0.0267 -0.0902 -3.0575 0.5181 166.66 0.0275 18.801
0.1122 41.107 -0.8479 -0.2907 0.0503 -0.1806 -3.2323 0.9665 204.62 0.0382 27.966
0.2017 55.442 -1.096 -0.3815 0.0684 -0.2814 -3.039 1.3035 183.3 0.0424 31.707
0.3357 61.513 -1.167 -0.4121 0.0766 -0.4662 -2.5939 1.4463 128.78 0.0408 30.336
0.5582 51.138 -0.9322 -0.3338 0.0643 -0.3437 -1.7604 1.2023 59.468 0.0306 22.024
1.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000
T=313.15 K
0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000
0.0483 23.845 -0.5574 -0.1839 0.028 -0.1224 -2.9836 0.4595 153.504 0.0265 17.7032
0.1126 44.469 -0.9908 -0.3325 0.0527 -0.2224 -3.1903 0.8569 187.817 0.0371 26.4153
0.2023 59.955 -1.2753 -0.435 0.0718 -0.3250 -3.0135 1.1553 166.616 0.0414 29.9609
0.3366 66.487 -1.3522 -0.4685 0.0805 -0.4885 -2.5791 1.2812 114.865 0.0401 28.6415
0.5591 55.227 -1.0754 -0.3783 0.0675 -0.3682 -1.7539 1.0642 50.8176 0.0300 20.7588
1.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000
T=318.15 K
0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000
0.0484 24.501 -0.6161 -0.1999 0.0284 -0.1598 -3.0326</> 0.3964 138.608 0.0255 16.3569
0.1128 45.684 -1.0925 -0.3608 0.0536 -0.2608 -3.2838 0.7391 169.078 0.0360 24.5109
0.2028 61.574 -1.4028 -0.4713 0.073 -0.3612 -3.1183 0.9962 148.486 0.0404 27.8389
0.3373 68.251 -1.4837 -0.5067 0.0817 -0.5066 -2.6773 1.1042 100.24 0.0392 26.6143
0.5599 56.65 -1.177 -0.4083 0.0685 -0.4082 -1.8251 0.9165 42.1016 0.0295 19.272
1.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000

(U) m.s-1

 

() Kg.m-3

 

In order to examine the inter molecular interactions in liquid mixtures of Ethyl Oleate with Ethyl methyl ketone experiments were conducted to find the density, viscosity and velocity of 2MHz ultrasonic waves for pure liquids and for liquid mixtures. The results of pure liquids are compared with literature values. The experimental values are coinciding with the values from the previous studies. The derived, excess values were calculated at various mole fractions of Ethyl Oleate for understanding the inter and intra molecular interactions at each temperature. Graphs were drawn for variation of the experimental and derived quantities with mole fraction of Ethyl Oleate at all the study temperatures as shown in graph 1 to graph 24. From the above studies it can be concluded that there exists a dipole-dipole interactions among the unlike molecules.

1400

1300

1200

1100

1000

0 0.5 1

Molefraction of Ethyl oleate

Graph 1 Ultrasonic Velocity VsMolefraction of Ethyl Oleate ( X1)

880

860

840

820

800

780

760

0 0.5 1

Molefraction of Ethyl oleate

Graph 2 Density Vs Mole fraction of Ethyl Oleate ( X1)

() Ns.m-2 11.5

10.5

9.5

8.5

7.5

6.5

5.5

0 0.5 1

Molefraction of Ethyl oleate

Graph 4 Adiabatic Compressibility VS Mole fraction of Ethyl Oleate (X1)

7.5

7

6.5

6

5.5

5

4.5

4

0 0.5 1

Molefraction of Ethyl oleate

Graph 5 Intermolecular freelengthVs Mole fraction of Ethyl Oleate ( X1)

400

300

200

100

0

0 0.5 1

Molefraction of Ethyl oleate

Graph 6 Molar Volume Vs Mole fraction of Ethyl Oleate ( X1)

20

15

10

5

0

0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1

Molefraction of Ethyl oleate

Graph 7 Raos Constant Vs Mole fraction of Ethyl Oleate ( X1)

30

25

20

15

10

5

0

0 0.5 1

Molefraction of Ethyl oleate

Graph 8 Wadas Constant Vs Mole fraction of Ethyl Oleate ( X1)

5

4

3

2

1

0

0 0.5 1

Molefraction of Ethyl Oleate

Graph 9 Free Volume Vs Mole fraction of Ethyl Oleate ( X1)

1.4

1.2

1

0.8

0.6

0 Molefraction 0.5 l Oleate 1

of Ethy

Graph 10 Acoustic Impedance Vs Mole fraction of Ethyl Oleate (X1)

 

6

(ad) 10-10 N-1.m2

 

5

4

3

2

1

0

0 0.5 1

Molefraction of Ethyl oleate

(R) 10-3 m10/3s-

1/3.mol-1

 

(L ) 10-10 m

 

f

 

(V ) 10-7 m3.mol-1

 

f

 

(W) 10-1 m3.mol-

1(N/m2)1/7

 

(Vm) 10-7 m3.mol-1

 

(Z) 106 Kg.m2s-1

 

Graph.3 Viscosity Vs Mole fraction of Ethyl Oleate ( X1)

(i) 106 N.m-2

 

(G) 10-20 KJ.mol-1

 

600

500

400

300

200

100

0 Molefracti0o.n5of Ethyl Oleate1 Graph 11 Internal Pressure Vs Mole fraction of Ethyl Oleate (X1)

0.125

0.12

0.115

0.11

0.105

0 0.5 1

Molefraction of Ethyl Oleate

Graph 12 Gibbs Free Energy Vs Mole fraction of Ethyl Oleate (X1)

90

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

0 0.5 1

Molefraction of Ethyl Oleate

Graph 13 Enthalpy Vs Mole fraction of Ethyl Oleate (X1

() 10-12 s
70

60

50

40

30

20

10

0

0 0.5 1

Molefraction of Ethyl Oleate Graph 15 Excess Velocity Vs Mole fraction of Ethyl Oleate (X1)

Molefraction of Ethyl Oleate

0

0 0.5 1

-0.5

-1

-1.5

-2

Graph 16 Deviation in Adiabatic Compressibility Vs Mole fraction of Ethyl Oleate (X1)

Molefraction of Ethyl Oleate 0.1

0.08

0

0 0.5 1 0.06

-0.2 0.04

-0.4 0.02

0

-0.6 0 0.5 1

Graph 17 Excess Intermolecular Free Length Vs Mole Molefraction of Ethyl Oleate

fraction of Ethyl Oleate (X1) Graph 18 Excess Acoustic Impedance Vs Mole fraction of

Ethyl Oleate(X1)

 

5

4

(H) KJ.mol-1

 

3

2

1

0

0 0.5 1

Molefraction of Ethyl Oleate

(LfE) 10-10 m

 

(U ) m.s

 

E -1

 

(Z ) 10 kg.m .s

 

E 6 2 -1

 

(ad ) 10 .N .m

 

E -10 -1 2

 

) Graph 14 Relaxation Time Vs Mole fraction of Ethyl Oleate (X1)

Molefraction of Ethyl Oleate

0

0 0.5 1

-0.2

-0.4

-0.6

graph 19 Excess Molar Volume Vs Mole fraction of Ethyl Oleate (X1)

Molefraction of Ethyl Oleate

0

-1 0 0.5 1

-2

-3

-4

Graph 20 Excess Free Volume Vs Mole fraction of Ethyl Oleate (X1)

2

1.5

1

0.5

0

0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1

Molefraction of Ethyl Oleate

Graph 21 Deviation in Viscosity Vs Mole fraction of Ethyl Oleate (X1)

250

200

150

100

50

0

0 0.5 1

Molefraction of Ethyl Oleate

Graph.22 Excess int. Pressure Vs Mole fraction of Ethyl Oleate (X1)

0.05

0.04

0.03

0.02

0.01

0

0 0.5 1

Molefraction of Ethyl Oleate

Graph 23 Excess Gibb’s Free Energy Vs Mole fraction of Ethyl Oleate( X1)

40

30

20

10

0

0 0.5 1

Molefraction of Ethyl Oleate

Graph 24 Excess Enthalpy Vs Mole fraction of Ethyl Oleate ( X1)

E

 

-7

 

(Vm ) 10

 

(G ) 10 kJ.mol

 

E -20

 

-1

 

m3.mol-1

 

(E) Ns.m-2

 

(VfE) 10-7

m3.mol-1

 

(HE) KJmol-1

 

( E) x 106 N.m-2

 

i

 

In the above system the experimental values are changing gradually from values of selected organic compounds Ethyl Methyl ketone at X1 is 0.0000 to the values of Ethyl Oleate at X1 is 1.0000. In addition to the shape, size and dipole moment of the molecule the main contributions to the excess properties to the mixture of liquids are i. physical like weak Vander-Waal type, ii. Chemical like strong hdrogen bonding and iii. Structural like interstitial accommodation [8-9]. The experimental values of the velocity (U), density () and viscosity () decreases with increase in temperature and increases with increase in mole fraction of

Ethyl Oleate at constant temperature. The derived parameters adiabatic compressibility (ad), intermolecular free length (Lf), molar volume (Vm)are increases with increase in temperature and there is no considerable change in the values of Raos constant

(R) and Wadas constant (W). The thermodynamic parameters free volume and Gibbs energy are increases with increase in

temperature and acoustic impedance, internal pressure, enthalpy and relaxation time are decreasing with the increase in temperature as shown in Table 4. Except internal pressure all other parameters shown in the same table are increasing with the increase in mole fraction of Ethyl Oleate at given temperature.

The excess parameters explain the nature and strength of molecular interactions shown in Table 5. The excess velocity

f

 

(UE), deviation in adiabatic compressibility (ad), excess inter molecular free length (LE), excess acoustic impedance (ZE),

E E E

excess molar volume (Vm ) excess free volume (Vf ), deviation in viscosity (), excess internal energy (

) , excess Gibbs free

energy (GE) and excess Enthalpy (HE) are calculated and presented in this chapter. The excess values are zero for pure

compounds. It has been reported [31] that excess values of the binary mixtures result from the contributions due to the physical, chemical, and structural characteristics of the component liquids. The physical contributions comprise of dispersion forces and

E

non-specific physical (weak) interactions, which lead to positive Vm

and ad values. The chemical contributions involve

E

breaking up of the associates present in the pure liquids, resulting in positive Vm

and ad values. These chemical contributions

also involve specific interactions such as formation of H-bonding, charge transfer (donoracceptor) complexes and strong dipole

E

dipole interactions between the component molecules of the mixture, resulting in negative Vm

and ad values. The structural

contributions are due to the geometrical fitting (favorable/unfavorable) of the molecules of very different molecular sizes into each others structures resulting in negative/positive excess values. In the present investigation, the excess adiabatic compressibility (ad), the excess free volume (VfE), excess free length (LfE) exhibit negative values over the entire range of composition at all temperatures studied clearly indicate the presence of strong interactions [32-41] between Ethyl Oleate and Ethyl Methyl Ketone. Further, the excess internal pressure (E) which is usually explained in terms of molecular interaction, whose negative excess values suggest that strong molecular interaction between the unlike molecules [40].The variation of experimental, derived thermo- acoustic and excess parameters with change in temperature and mole fraction of Ethyl Oleate are shown as graphs from graph.1 to 24.

The excess values those explain the nature of interactions for the system are shown in relevant Table 5 for mixtures of Ethyl Oleate with Ethyl Methyl Ketone. The excess values are zero for pure liquids. The negative excess values indicate the strong interaction whereas the positive shows the relatively weak interactions [42-44]. Positive values of excess velocity and excess viscosity represent strong interactions. Except the excess velocity (UE), excess acoustic impedance (ZE), excess viscosity (), excess Gibbs free energy (GE) and excess Enthalpy (HE) remaining all the excess parameters for the binary mixture for the system is negative.

Conclusions

The ultrasonic velocity, density and viscosity measurements have been carried out for determination of ultrasonic parameters for the different composition range of Ethyl Oleate and Ethyl Methyl Ketone at different temperatures viz. 303.15 K, 308.15K,

313.15K and 318.15K.The negative values of ad suggest that the binary liquid mixture is less compressible than the

corresponding ideal liquids and the positive values indicate the reverse actions. The maximum negative values of adiabatic

compressibility (ad) are -1.1584, -1.1670, -1.3522 and -1.4837 at the four temperatures under study. The negative excess

E

values of molar volume (Vm

) and positive excess values of viscosity () shows the molecular interaction between Ethyl

Oleate and Ethyl Methyl Ketone due to dipole-dipole molecular interaction.

AKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The author is very much thankful to UGC for sanctioning fellowship, which financially helped for procuring instruments and chemicals, Andhra University for providing infrastructure facilities.

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