Smart Irrigation System using Arduino with Solar Power

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  • Open Access
  • Authors : Saleh Elkelani Babaa , Muneer Ahmed , Babatunde Samuel Ogunleye, Shahid Ali Khan , Salim Ahmed Al-Jahdhami, John Regan Pillai
  • Paper ID : IJERTV9IS050088
  • Volume & Issue : Volume 09, Issue 05 (May 2020)
  • Published (First Online): 10-05-2020
  • ISSN (Online) : 2278-0181
  • Publisher Name : IJERT
  • License: Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

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Smart Irrigation System using Arduino with Solar Power

Saleh Elkelani Babaa Systems Engineering Department Military Technological College

PO Box 262, Postal Code 111 Muscat, Oman

Salim Ahmed Al-Jahdhami Systems Engineering Department Military Technological College PO Box 262, Postal Code 111 Muscat, Oman

Muneer Ahmed Systems Engineering Department Military Technological College

PO Box 262, Postal Code 111 Muscat, Oman

Shahid Ali Khan Systems Engineering Department Military Technological College

PO Box 262, Postal Code 111 Muscat, Oman

Babatunde Samuel Ogunleye Systems Engineering Department Military Technological college PO Box 262, Postal Code 111 Muscat, Oman

John Regan Pillai Systems Engineering Department Military Technological College

PO Box 262, Postal Code 111 Muscat, Oman

Abstract This paper deals with the innovative technology in considering the various ways to irrigate the agricultural land using solar power. Since the agriculture plays the significant role in improving the countrys economy, an improvement should be applied in order to increase the productivity and expand the quality of crops. So, this project signifies a smart Auto-irrigation system by using soil moisture sensors is connected to the Arduino Uno which act as a controller and a global System for mobile communication which is used to transmit and receive the data between the controller and user. The study is conducted in practically and has achieved the objectives.

KeywordsSoil Moisture sensors, Arduino Uno, GSM, Solar Power

  1. INTRODUCTION

    The increasing demand for energy, the constant decline in existing sources of fossil fuels and the growing alarm regarding environment pollution, have pushed mankind to discover new non-conventional, renewable energy resources such as solar, wind energy, etc. for the production of electrical energy [1]. Since Oman receives sunlight all 12 months of a year. Hence utilizing it in the different fields is a clever idea. Solar energy is the most ample source of energy in the world. Photovoltaic generation is an effective approach for using the solar energy. Photovoltaic pumping systems (PVPs) are easy to be installed in any place and they require less maintenance maybe every 5 to 10 years intervals so that reduce the overall cost, just the cost of the photovoltaic cells and the other equipment needed which consider as the initial capital cost [1] [2]. Also, they doesnt require non-renewable source of power to operate because the dependent of solar power. Since the solar pumps doesnt relies to the diesel or oil so they consider as a silent and clean system with no air pollution or noise [3]. So, this such system is good for people who live in faraway from the water and electricity networks and even for those who live in cities [4].

    The cost of solar panels has been continuously decreasing which encourages its usage in various sectors. One of the applications of this technology is used in irrigation systems for farming [5]. Solar powered irrigation system can be an

    appropriate alternative for farmers in the present state of energy crisis in Oman and other countries [1]. In this paper we propose an smart irrigation system using solar power which drives water pumps to pump water from bore well to a tank and the outlet valve of tank is automatically regulated using Arduino UNO, GSM and moisture sensor to control the flow rate of water from the tank to the irrigation field which optimizes the use of water [6].

    An Arduino-based automated irrigation system use Android smart phone for remote control, is suggested by A.N. Arvindan and Keerthika. D [7]. They said that this system will be economical and easy to use. This system consist of Arduino Uno processor gets its input voltage signal from the soil moisture sensors which measure the moisture content in the soil. The Arduino compare the data came from the sensors with predetermined threshold value. The Arduino connected to the Android smart phone by a wireless via HC-05 module. The received data in the Android smart phone is displayed on the user interface (UI). The UI provide easy remote control of irrigation for the user involve switching ON and OFF [7].

    Srishti and Rawal [8], suggested that making smart agricultural by using IoT (Internet of Things) technologies. The idea of their project has three concerns, firstly it involve a sound alarm used to detect any intruder into the farm weather it was a human or animal. Secondly, the project was to prevent the crops from damage during rain. The rain water also being recycled for irrigation efficiency. Thirdly, was for smart irrigation. The operations performed by interfacing sensors, Wi-Fi module and GSM module. This project intend to solve many problems like reducing wastage of water, human effort and give the farmer updated information about the field through his mobile device. The smart irrigation system is firmware based. Figure 4, show the project system configuration [8].

      1. Methodology

        In order to have good irrigation system, the specification of the water pump should satisfy the required land area which is being irrigated. So, initially we should calculate the land area for irrigation and then select the suitable water pump to irrigate on a particular area. Also, with respect to the solar

        panel, it should be able to generate the suitable amount of power to operate the water pump and the control system [9] [10]-[20].

        First, the system implemented to record humidity data using soil sensors as shown in the threshold of the system humidity Figure 1, and control in Figure 2 is programmed to operate the system. If the soil is dry more than 800 then the soil sensor will send signal to Arduino to turn on using mobile phone the pump to irrigate and if it is wet less than 400, the pump will be turned off.

        B.Arduino Uno

        Figure 4, Arduino Uno

        Figure 1, Thresholds of the system humidity

        Figure 2, Flow chart of smart irrigation system

  2. COMPONENTS

        1. Soil Moisture Sensor

    Shown in Figure 3, soil moisture sensors usually refer to sensors that estimate volumetric water content. This device used to convert the physical parameters in to an electric signals. The function of this sensor is to sense the content of the moisture in the soil.

    Figure 3, Soil Moisture Sensor

    The Arduino Uno shown in Figure 4, is an open source electronic platform with a microcontroller board based on ATmeage328, and integrated development environment is provided by Arduino project based on a programming language called processing. It supports low-power consumption, huge documentation, large libraries and highly portable.

    1. GSM SIM 900 shield for Arduino

      GSM shown in Figure 5, is stand for Global System for Mobile Communication. The research standards for GSM is 802.11. GSM Sim 900 is a digital transmitting and receiving device used for open air in cellular mobiles. In this project it used to make a communication between user (farmer) and the system for long distance to control the

      Figure 5, GSM SIM 900 shield for Arduino

    2. Inter Integrated Circuit (IIC or I2C)

      Figure 6, is a serial computer bus. It is a small piece used to connect lower-speed peripheral ICs to processors and microcontrollers. In this project it has been used to connect LCD to Arduino.

      Figure 6, I2C connected to LCD and Arduino.

    3. Solar Panel

      Solar power panel as shown in figure 7, is a device used to convert the sunlight and temperature directly to electrical powe. In this project the PV panel used is (185*250*15 mm) size with (5 W), Used MPPT controller to generate the maximum power [21].

      Figure 7, Solar Panel (5W) (185 x 200×15 mm).

    4. Dc Water Pump

      Figure 8 is a DC water pump used to pump the water from one point to another. With (DC 12V) (4.2 W) (Qmax: 204L/H).

      which connected to the I2C. Then some main functions came like the (call GSM call). The next commands which start with (unsigned int) represent the integral values but not the negatives. For example the command (unsigned int attempt =

      3) mean that there are three attempts for the system to call the registered user. The followed commands which start with (Boolean) it indicates that there are two statements rather True or False (1 or 0 in binary).

      Figure 10, Experimental setup of smart irrigation system

      No.

      Component

      Specification

      1

      Solar Panel

      5W

      2

      Water Pump

      12V DC

      3

      Size of plants land

      0.4

      4

      Arduino

      5 V

      5

      GSM SIM900 shield for Arduino

      9V, Require SIM CARD,

      6

      Soil Moisture Sensors

      4 sensors

      7.

      LCD

      I2C

      * The system could irrigate land area of 2

      No.

      Component

      Specification

      1

      Solar Panel

      5W

      2

      Water Pump

      12V DC

      3

      Size of plants land

      0.4

      4

      Arduino

      5 V

      5

      GSM SIM900 shield for Arduino

      9V, Require SIM CARD,

      6

      Soil Moisture Sensors

      4 sensors

      7.

      LCD

      I2C

      * The system could irrigate land area of 2

      Table 1. Shows the specification of the designed system

    5. Relay

    Figure 8, 12V DC Water Pump

    It is an electrically operated device, used in this project to control the operation of the water pump, shown in Figure 9.

    Figure 9, Relay

  3. IMPLEMENTATIONS AND RESULTS

    The smart irrigation system has built as shown in figure 10, illustrate the final stage with all components of the project; solar panel, plants area size, electronic board with control, relay switch, smart phone, LCD, water pump, moisture sensors, and GSM for Arduino. The system specification measurement has been considered as shown in table 1. The control algorithm has been programmed in Arduino Uno and was uploaded to microcontroller as shown in Appendix. The developed smart control to enable the irrigation system to automatic start or stop the water pump when the moister content reaches presented thresholds in Figure1.

    As can be seen in the appendix, the commands represent the libraries which must be mentioned firstly using the command (include). There are three libraries, one for the SIM900 component, second for the call function, third for the LCD

    Other part of the program shows the statement of the auto- irrigation process, if function has been used. Here there are

    6 cases between OR Gate and each case depend on two values from two different sensors, so if there is one of the cases is achieved (true), the if function will be satisfied, so the irrigation process is True mean the irrigation is ON.

    The main component in this system is the Arduino, which consider as the brain of the system. It provide the logical functions of the system. Its programmed to implement two cases, automatic irrigation and semi-manually controlled by the user through its mobile phone. The Arduino require 5 volt gained from the solar panel. The four soil moisture sensors have a moisture values from 0 to 1023, indicate extremely wet, extremely dry respectively. They provide four different values of moisture content of the soil for the same land area but at different positions. Then send these data to the Arduino which will compare these values with the threshold values determined by the user at the programming stage. The threshold set as follow: If two sensors provide moisture more

    than 800, pump turned ON, when all moister sensors reach value less than 400, the pump will turn OFF.

    In case when two out of four sensors record humidity data more than 800 (soil is dry), the Arduino should turn ON the system automatically to irrigate the land until the four sensors record humidity values less than 400 (soil is wet). Then all sensors indicate that the soil is wet and the Arduino also indicate that in the LCD screen and will turn the pump OFF. In case, if the system is controlled by the user. So, when two out of four sensors record humidity data more than 800 (soil is very dry), the Arduino should call the farmer through GSM SIM900, then the farmer should call back the system to turn the water pump ON which will irrigate the land as shown in Figure 11. When the four sensors record humidity values less than 400 (soil is very wet) then the controller will stop the system automatically.

    Figure 11, LCD Screen show the sensors readings and the system call the user, and the call appear in the user's phone.

    A. Clay soil permeability

    The table 2 and the graph below show the recorded moisture data of the clay soil recorded by the four soil moisture sensors every each five seconds. The last column in the table illustrate the average humidity value for the four sensors which has been calculated and represented in figure 12.

    Table 2. Humidity value with respect to time recorded by the sensors for Clay soil.

    Time(s)

    Sensor1

    Sensor2

    Sensor3

    Sensor4

    Mean

    0

    980

    983

    988

    989

    985

    5

    983

    983

    988

    989

    985.75

    10

    813

    893

    895

    915

    879

    15

    800

    887

    879

    912

    869.5

    20

    800

    891

    813

    912

    854

    25

    780

    883

    813

    765

    810.25

    30

    741

    859

    723

    500

    705.75

    35

    745

    514

    723

    401

    595.75

    40

    716

    303

    679

    260

    489.5

    45

    310

    335

    676

    260

    395.25

    50

    261

    288

    278

    249

    269

    Figure 12, The Average value of humidity recorded by the four sensors in Clay soil.

    B. Sand Soil permeability

    The table 3 and the graph below show the recorded moisture data of the sand soil recorded by the four soil moisture sensors every each five seconds. The last column in the table illustrate the average humidityvalue for the four sensors which has been calculated and represented in the Figure 13.

    Table 3. Humidity value with respect to time recorded by the sensors for Sand soil.

    Time(s)

    Sensor1

    Sensor2

    Sensor3

    Sensor4

    Mean

    0

    988

    982

    989

    990

    987.25

    5

    988

    982

    982

    989

    985.25

    10

    988

    988

    979

    986

    985.25

    15

    989

    989

    950

    987

    978.75

    20

    989

    988

    911

    987

    968.75

    25

    989

    989

    500

    987

    866.25

    30

    942

    942

    500

    950

    833.5

    35

    537

    931

    467

    933

    717

    40

    326

    827

    374

    527

    513.5

    45

    323

    443

    374

    444

    396

    50

    324

    373

    376

    398

    367.75

    Figure 13, The Average value of humidity recorded by the four sensors in Sand soil.

      1. oarse soil permability

        The table 4 below shows the recorded moisture data of the sand soil recorded by the four soil moisture sensors every each five seconds. The last column in the table illustrate the average humidity value for the four sensors which has been calculated and represented in the Figure 14.

        Table 4. Humidity value with respect to time recorded by the sensors for coarse soil.

        Time(s)

        Sensor1

        Sensor2

        Sensor3

        Sensor4

        Mean

        0

        980

        989

        989

        987

        986.25

        5

        980

        989

        989

        987

        986.25

        10

        988

        987

        989

        988

        988

        15

        980

        987

        988

        988

        985.75

        20

        988

        989

        989

        987

        988.25

        25

        988

        988

        949

        987

        978

        30

        980

        965

        813

        987

        936.25

        35

        800

        812

        612

        832

        764

        40

        656

        612

        401

        590

        5645

        45

        440

        366

        359

        428

        398.25

        50

        280

        265

        277

        265

        271.75

        Figure 14, The Average value of humidity recorded by the four sensors in coarse soil.

  4. CONCLUSION

The aim of this project to save time, money and water consumption, by providing smart control irrigation system using friendly solar power. This is an important study in energy and environmental sector.

The irrigation control system was designed, executed, and have achieved the research aims:

      • Sense the moisture of the soil through the soil moisture (humidity) sensors.

      • Display the humidity data provided by the sensors in LCD screen.

      • Arduino is programmed and connected with mobile phone to automatically control irrigation system.

      • To contact the user via mankind smart phone when the soil is dry or moist to automatically turn ON and OFF the water pump in order to irrigate the plants land.

This smart control irrigation system is beneficial in places where there are shortage of water, absence of electrical grid and huge farming lands.

    1. Future Work

      Since the scope of the project was using the water pumping system for irrigation and control this system by

      microcontroller, there are extra things could be added to improve this project. A water level sensors could be added to irrigate the land with the suitable amount of water. Also, noise sensor could be added to protect the farm field from the animals or even human get closer to the farm by producing a noisy sound as an alarm or buzzer.

      Another idea should be added in this project is to add an electronic gate valves in order if there are multi farms need to be irrigated individually at different times controlled by one system shown in Figure 15. Each land area should has its own sensors connected to the controller as an input. Also, the electronic gate valves should be connected to the controller as an output.

      Figure. 15, Irrigation system control with 4 different lands.

      Another recommendation should be considered in this project is that the farmer should have the option of controlling the water pump in case of crops is damaged, so no need for irrigation even the soil is dry because there is no plants. Also, improve this system to include the other functions rather than irrigation only. We could add seeding, ploughing and fertilizing functions to be implemented automatically whether using Arduino or PLC as a controller.

      Moreover, develop using the GSM Module for remote control. For example, use this technology to remotely switch ON/OFF the AC in home or Open/Close the door of the home and other functions in order to make a smart house.

      REFERENCES

      1. Geoffrey, G., Dieu, M. , Pierre, N. and Aimable, T. (2015) Design of Automatic Irrigation System for Small Farmers in Rwanda. Agricultural Sciences, 6, 291-294.

        doi: 10.4236/as.2015.63029.

      2. S. Babaa, M. Armstrong, "Novel control strategy for photovoltaic systems based on irradiation in International Renewable Energy Congress (IREC 2017), 8th IEEE International Conference.

      3. S. Babaa, M. Armstrong, and V. Pickert, "High efficiency standalone photovoltaic system using adaptive switching of an interleaved boost converter," in Power Electronics, Machines and Drives (PEMD 2012), 6th IET International Conference on, pp. 1- 7.

      4. EMCON (2006): Feasibility Assessment for the Replacement of Diesel Water Pumps with Solar Water Pumps. Final Report. Windhoek:Ministry of Mines and Energy, Namibia URL: [https://sswm.info/node/4539 ].

      5. United States Departments of Agriculture (October 2006) Design of Small Photovoltaic (PV) Solar-Powered Water Pump Systems Technical Note No. 28 PORTLAND, OREGON.

      6. Marcuzzo, F. and Wendland, E. (2014) The Optimization of Irrigation Networks Using Genetic Algorithms. Journal of Water

        Resource and Protection, 6, 1124-1138.

        doi: 10.4236/jwarp.2014.612105.

      7. A. N. Arvindan and D. Keerthika, "Experimental investigation of remote control via Android smart phone of arduino-ased automated irrigation system using moisture sensor," 2016 3rd International Conference on Electrical Energy Systems (ICEES), Chennai, 2016, pp. 168-175.

      8. Srishti Rawal,IOT based Smart Irrigation System International Journal of Computer Applications (0975 8887) Volume 159 No 8, February 2017.

      9. Himasailaja.V¹, Needhidasan.S² (2017)SMART IRRIGATION FOR SMART CITIES A SYSTEM NEEDED FOR INDIA-A REVIEW International Journal of Pure and Applied Mathematics. Volume 119 No. 17 2018, 253-262.

      10. Ingram, W, Saeb, L. , Sadr, S. , Hygate, R. and Memon, F. (2018) A Preliminary Investigation of Smart Rural Water Distribution Systems in the Gambia. Journal of Water Resource and Protection, 10, 395-407. doi: 10.4236/jwarp.2018.104021.

      11. Ogidan, O, Onile, A. and Adegboro, O. (2019) Smart Irrigation System: A Water Management Procedure. Agricultural Sciences, 10,25-31. doi: 10.4236/as.2019.101003.

      12. S. Babaa, M. Armstrong, "High efficient interleaved boost converter with novel switch adaptive control in photovoltaic systems in Power Electronics, Drive Systems and technologies (PEDSTC 2017), 8th IEEE International Conference.

      13. Babaa, S. Novel Switch Adaptive Control to Improve the Efficiency of Boost Converter in Photovoltaic Systems. Journal of Power and Energy Engineering, 5,1-14. 2017. doi: 10.4236/jpee.2017.57001

      14. Thompson, K. and Kadiyala, R. (2013) Protecting Water Quality and Public Health Using a Smart Grid. Computational Water, Energy, and Environmental Engineering, 2, 73-80.

        doi: 10.4236/cweee.2013.22B013.

      15. Amala, S. and Aleru, C. (2016) Bacteriological Quality of Swimming Pools Water in Port Harcourt Metropolis. Natural Science, 8, 79-84. doi: 10.4236/ns.2016.83010.

      16. Babaa, S, Murr, G. , Mohamed, F. and Pamuri, S. Overview of Boost Converters for Photovoltaic Systems. Journal of Power and Energy Engineering, 6, 16-31. 2018, doi: 10.4236/jpee.2018.64002.

      17. Al-Mashakbeh, H. (2017) The Influence of Lithostratigraphy on the Type and Quality of Stored Water in Mujib Reservoir- Jordan. Journal of Environmental Protection, 8, 568-590.

        doi: 10.4236/jep.2017.84038.

      18. Zeng, S. , Li, J. , Schumann, R. and Smart, R. (2013) Effect of pH and Dissolved Silicate on the Formation of Surface Passivation Layers for Reducing Pyrite Oxidation. Computational Water, Energy, and Environmental Engineering, 2, 50-55.

        doi: 10.4236/cweee.2013.22B009.

      19. Alkarrami, F, Iqbal, T. , Pope, K. and Rideout, G. (2020) Dynamic Modelling of Submersible Pump Based Solar Water- Pumping System with Three-Phase Induction Motor Using MATLAB. Journal of Power and Energy Engineering, 8, 20-64. doi: 10.4236/jpee.2020.82002.

      20. S. Khader and A. Daud, "PV-Grid Tie System Energizing Water Pump," Smart Grid and Renewable Energy, Vol. 4 No. 5, 2013, pp. 409-418. doi: 10.4236/sgre.2013.45047.

      21. Babaa, S., Armstrong, M. and Pickert, V. Overview of Maximum Power Point Tracking Control Methods for PV Systems. Journal of Power and Energy Engineering, 2, 59-72. 2014. doi: 10.4236/jpee.2014.28006.

APPENDIX

// Libraries used in the program

#include "SIM900.h"

#include "call.h"

#include <LiquidCrystal_I2C.h>

LiquidCrystal_I2C lcd (0x3F); // Initialization of LCD with address in hex 3F

CallGSM call; // Initialization of GSM function named "call"

//Variables declaration

unsigned int attempt = 3; // call attempt 3X

unsigned int bilang = 0; // 10sec waiting time before the next call

unsigned int val0; // Moisture sensor1 unsigned int val1; // Moisture sensor2 unsigned int val2; // Moisture sensor3 unsigned int val3; // Moisture sensor4

boolean called_already = false; //to know if it has called already or is calling at the moment

boolean wait_before_call = true; //waiting for an answer/reply call from the owner

boolean irrigate = false; //indicator of irrigation is whether on/off boolean tito_done = false; //if 3 attempts of calling is done

boolean automatic = true; //switch if manual or automatic turning on of irrigation/water pump

void setup()

{

pinMode(3, OUTPUT); // LED indicator for irrigation pinMode(4, INPUT); // switch pin for automatic/manual

digitalWrite(3, irrigate); // LED indicator is initialized to be off (false)

Serial.begin(9600); lcd.begin(16,2); //Initialization of Serial communication of Arduino. LCD initialization 16X2 display

Serial.println("Initializing"); lcd.print("Initializing");

if (gsm.begin(9600)) // Initialization of the GSM function/kit

{

Serial.println("Status=READY"); //if GSM successfully initialized lcd.setCursor(0,1); lcd.print("Status=READY");

}

else

{

Serial.println("Status=IDLE"); //if GSM did not initialized lcd.setCursor(0,1); lcd.print("Status=IDLE");

}

}

void loop()

{

val0 = analogRead(0); val1 = analogRead(1); val2 = analogRead(2); val3

= analogRead(3); //Analog value of the 4 sensors (1023 max value) Serial.println("Moisture:"); Serial.print(val0); Serial.print("\t");

Serial.print(val1); Serial.print("\t"); Serial.print(val2); Serial.print("\t");

Serial.println(val3); //Serial display lcd.clear(); //clear previous LCD display

lcd.setCursor(0,0); lcd.print(":"); lcd.print(val0); lcd.print("/");

lcd.print(val1); lcd.print("/"); lcd.print(val2); lcd.print("/"); lcd.print(val3);

//LCD display

if(digitalRead(4)) //switch for automatic/manual

{

if ((val0>800 && val1>800) || (val0>800 && val2>800) || (val0>800 && val3>800) || (val1>800 && val2>800) || (val1>800 && val3>800) || (val2>800 && val3>800)) //if statement for any of the 2 sensors are both more than 800 value

{

digitalWrite(3, irrigate); if(!tito_done)

{

while (called_already)

{

switch (call.CallStatus())

{

case CALL_NONE: // Nothing is happening Serial.println("Waiting for a call"); lcd.setCursor(0,1);

lcd.print("Waiting a call");

val0 = analogRead(0); val1 = analogRead(1); val2 = analogRead(2); val3 = analogRead(3);

Serial.println("Moisture:"); Serial.print(val0); Serial.print("\t"); Serial.print(val1); Serial.print("\t"); Serial.print(val2); Serial.print("\t"); Serial.println(val3);

lcd.setCursor(0,0); lcd.print(":"); lcd.print(val0); lcd.print("/"); lcd.print(val1); lcd.print("/"); lcd.print(val2); lcd.print("/"); lcd.print(val3);

if (val0<700 && val1<700 && val2<700 && val3<700)

{

tito_done = true; goto luwas;

}

if (bilang == 10)

{

wait_before_call = true; called_already = false; bilang = 0;

}

bilang++; break;

case CALL_INCOM_VOICE : // Yes! Someone is calling us Serial.println("Welcome");

Serial.println("Pump is ON"); lcd.setCursor(0,1); lcd.print("Pump is now ON");

irrigate = true; tito_done = true; goto luwas;

}

delay(1000);

}

if ((!called_already) && wait_before_call)

{

if (attempt)

{

attempt = attempt – 1; wait_before_call = false; called_already = true; call.Call("95366103");

Serial.println("Now calling 95366103"); lcd.setCursor(0,1); lcd.print("Call: 95366103");

delay(10000);

}

else

{

attempt = 3;

Serial.println("Pump is ON"); lcd.setCursor(0,1); lcd.print("Pump is now ON");

irrigate = true; tito_done = true; goto luwas;

}

}

}

<>else

{

if (val0<400 && val1<400 && val2<400 && val3<400)

{

Serial.println("Pump is OFF"); lcd.setCursor(0,1); lcd.print("Pump is CLOSED");

irrigate = false; tito_done = false; bilang = 0; called_already = false; wait_before_call = true;

}

digitalWrite(3, irrigate);

}

delay(1000);

}

else

{

if ((val0>800 && val1>800) || (val0>800 && val2>800) || (val0>800 && val3>800) || (val1>800 && val2>800) || (val1>800 && val3>800) || (val2>800 && val3>800)) //if statement for any of the 2 sensors are both more than 800 value

{

irrigate = true; //signals the irrigation is on digitalWrite(3, irrigate); //LED indicator for pump is on

Serial.println("Pump switch ON"); lcd.setCursor(0,1); lcd.print("Pump switch ON"); //display

}

else //if values of any of 2-sensors are not more than 800

{

if(irrigate) { Serial.println("Pump switch ON"); lcd.setCursor(0,1); lcd.print("Pump switch ON"); }

else { Serial.println("Pump is OFF"); lcd.setCursor(0,1); lcd.print("Pump is CLOSED"); }

if (val0<400 && val1<400 && val2<400 && val3<400)

{

Serial.println("Pump is OFF"); lcd.setCursor(0,1); lcd.print("Pump is CLOSED");

irrigate = false;

}

digitalWrite(3, irrigate);

if(irrigate) { Serial.println("Pump switch ON"); lcd.setCursor(0,1); lcd.print("Pump switch ON"); }

else { Serial.println("Pump is CLOSED"); lcd.setCursor(0,1); lcd.print("Pump is CLOSED"); }

}

luwas:;

}

else

{

if(irrigate) { Serial.println("Pump switch ON"); lcd.setCursor(0,1); lcd.print("Pump switch ON"); }

else { Serial.println("Pump is OFF"); lcd.setCursor(0,1); lcd.print("Pump is CLOSED"); }

//reinitialization of variable for manual mode tito_done = false;

bilang = 0; called_already = false; wait_before_call = true;

}

delay(1000);

}

}

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