Potential Utilization of Steel and Polypropylene Fibre on Ternary Blended Concrete

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Potential Utilization of Steel and Polypropylene Fibre on Ternary Blended Concrete

Rekha Ambi

Assistant Professor Department of Civil Engineering

TKM College of Engineering Kollam, Kerala, India

Praveen P L

M.Tech Student, Department of Civil Engineering

T.K.M College of Engineering Kollam, Kerala, India

AbstractThe present paper focuses on investigating the characteristics of M30 concrete with addition of Steel and Polypropylene fiber on a ternary blended concrete made out of Ground Granulated Blast Furnace slag (GGBS) and Sugar cane Bagasse ash. Here specimens are cast by adding Steel fiber at (0.5,1.0,1.5,2.0)% by volume of concrete and Polypropylene Fiber at (0.1,0.2,0.3,0.4)% by volume of concrete to the ternary blended concrete(TBC). It was found that the optimum dosage for Steel Fiber was 1.5% and that for Polypropylene was 0.3%.

KeywordsGGBS, Sugarcane Bagasse ash, Ternary Blended concrete, Fibre reinforced concrete(FRC).

I INTRODUCTION

Concrete is a versatile engineering material and its popularity as a basic building material is because of its good durability, ease with which it can be manufactured, the ability to mould it into any shape and size and its high compressive strength. But it has the demerits that plain concrete possess a very low tensile strength, limited ductility and little resistance to cracking. Internal micro cracks are inherently present in the concrete and its poor tensile strength is due to the propagation of the micro cracks, eventually leading to the brittle fracture of the concrete. Fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) is defined as the concrete made with hydraulic cement, containing fine or fine and coarse aggregate with discontinuous discrete fibers. FRC could play an important role to reduce the above mentioned problems.

Another important aspect is that since cement being inevitable in the production of concrete cement production is a significant source of global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, making up approximately 2.4 percent of global CO2 emissions from industrial and energy sources. The solution for this is to make binary or ternary blended concrete having Supplementary Cementitious Materials (SCM) which could have reduce the cement usage and also reduce the cost of concrete.

As a solution to the stated problems this study examines the effect of addition of fiber such as steel and polypropylene to a Ternary Blended Concrete (TBC), a concrete made with ordinary Portland cement with two other Supplementary Cementitious Materials. In this study the selected composition is 30% cement replacement by

Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag (GGBS) and 10% cement replacement by Sugar cane Bagasse ash (BA).

  1. OBJECTIVE

    • To form a control mix with optimum cement replacement of

    • GGBS by 30% by weight of cement and BAGASSEASH by 10% weight of cement.

    • To add fiber to this control mix with Polypropylene fiber 0.1,0.2,0.3,0.4% by volume of concrete and Steel Fiber 0.5,1,1.5,2.0 % by volume of concrete.

    • To find the optimum dosage of steel and polypropylene fiber.

    • To perform regression analysis.

      II METHODOLGY

    • Material Testing

    • Casting of Specimens

    • Testing for Compressive strength, Flexural strength, Impact resistance, Modulus of elasticity, Split tensile strength.

The properties of the tested material are shown below.

  1. Cement:

    Ordinary Portland cement, 53 Grade conforming to IS: 8112-1989. The specific gravity of cement was 3.14.

  2. Fine aggregate

    M.Sand conforming to Grading zone II of IS: 383 1970. Its specific gravity was 2.61

  3. Coarse aggregate

    Locally available crushed granite stones conforming to graded aggregate of nominal size 20 mm as per IS: 383 1970.

  4. Ground Granulated Blast Slag (GGBS)

    Ground granulated blast furnace slag obtained from Bangalore. Ground granulated blast-furnace slag is the granular material formed when molten iron blast furnace slag is rapidly chilled (quenched) by immersion in water. It is a granular product with very limited crystal formation, is highly Cementitious in nature and, ground to

    cement fineness, and hydrates like Portland cement. Specific gravity 2.87

  5. Bagasse ash (BA)

    The sugar cane bagasse ash was obtained from Erode sugar factory. Specific gravity- 1.95

  6. Super Plasticizer

    A commercially available sulphonated naphthalene formaldehyde based super plasticizer (CERAPLAST 300) was used as chemical admixture to enhance the workability of the concrete.

  7. Steel fiber (SF)

    Corrugated steel fibers of aspect ratio 55 are used.

  8. Polypropylene fiber

The commercially manufactured Recron-3S by Reliance Petro Chemicals is used.

Mix Design

TABLE-1: CONCRETE MIX DESIGN

Cement (kg/m3)

GGBS

(kg/m3)

Bagasse ash (kg/m3)

M. Sand (kg/m3)

Coarse Aggregate (kg/m3)

w/c ratio

228

114

38

672.78

1192.2

0.43

Mix Designation

Mix Designati on

Steel (% by volume of concrete)

Mix Designation

Poly propylene (% by volume of Concrete)

C

0

C

0

S1

0.5

P1

0.1

S2

1

P2

0.3

S3

1.5

P3

0.5

S4

2.0

P4

0.4

Mix Designati on

Steel (% by volume of concrete)

Mix Designation

Poly propylene (% by volume of Concrete)

C

0

C

0

S1

0.5

P1

0.1

S2

1

P2

0.3

S3

1.5

P3

0.5

S4

2.0

P4

0.4

TABLE -2: MIX DESIGNATION

Fig 1: Compressive strength of Steel Fibre added concrete

Fig2: Compressive strength of Polypropylene Fibre added

concrete

Fig 3: Flexural Strength of Steel fibre added concrete

  1. RESULTS AND DISCUSSIONS

    A. Tests on Hardened property

    The various tests for hardened concrete has been performed and tabulated.

    5.05

    5

    Flexural strngth

    Flexural strngth

    4.95

    4.9

    4.85

    4.8

    4.75

    4.7

    4.65

    C P1 P2 P3 P4

    28 day 4.77 4.82 4.89 5 4.92

    Fig 4: Flexural Strength of Polypropylene fibre added concrete

    Fig 5: Impact strength of Steel fibre added concrete

    Fig 6: Impact strength of Polypropylene added concrete

    Split tensile Strenght (N/mm2)

    Split tensile Strenght (N/mm2)

    Split strength

    C

    S1

    S2

    S3

    S4

    28 DAY

    3.55

    3.6

    4.544

    5

    4.2

    C

    S1

    S2

    S3

    S4

    28 DAY

    3.55

    3.6

    4.544

    5

    4.2

    6

    5

    4

    3

    2

    1

    0

    3.85

    Split tensile strength

    (N/mm2)

    Split tensile strength

    (N/mm2)

    C

    P1

    P2

    P3

    P4

    28 day

    3.55

    3.6

    3.6

    3.8

    3.7

    C

    P1

    P2

    P3

    P4

    28 day

    3.55

    3.6

    3.6

    3.8

    3.7

    3.8

    3.75

    3.7

    3.65

    3.6

    3.55

    3.5

    3.45

    3.4

    Modulus of elasticity (Gpa)

    Modulus of elasticity (Gpa)

    Fig 8: Split strngth of Polypropylene added concrete

    60

    50

    40

    30

    20

    10

    0

    C

    S1 S2 S3 S4

    60

    50

    40

    30

    20

    10

    0

    C

    S1 S2 S3 S4

    28 day 34.541 45.336 47.776 51.701 44.321

    28 day 34.541 45.336 47.776 51.701 44.321

    Modulus of elasticity

    (N/mm2)

    Modulus of elasticity

    (N/mm2)

    Fig 9: Modulus of elasticity of steel added concret

    50

    40

    30

    20

    10

    0

    C

    P1 P2 P3 P4

    50

    40

    30

    20

    10

    0

    C

    P1 P2 P3 P4

    28 day 34.54 41.52 42.63 46.68 44.39

    28 day 34.54 41.52 42.63 46.68 44.39

    Fig 10: Modulus of elasticity of Polypropylene added concrete

    Fig 7: Split strength of Steel fibre added concrete

    70

    60

    50

    40

    30 y = -15.107×3 + 39.529×2 – 8.6305x +

    20

    10

    0

    70

    60

    50

    40

    30 y = -15.107×3 + 39.529×2 – 8.6305x +

    20

    10

    0

    Compressive strenght

    Compressive strenght

    could be the reason why it further showed the reduction in strength latter on.

    1. Fibre could play an important role in arresting the crack in the concrete.

      39.798

      R² = 0.9938

      39.798

      R² = 0.9938

    2. Crack arrestment would definitely improve durability of concrete.

    3. Regression curve can further clarify the optimum dosage

    0 1 2 3

    % Steel fiber

    0 1 2 3

    % Steel fiber

    Fig 11: Regression curve fitting for Compressive strength with steel variation

  2. CONCLUSION

  1. From all the cases it was seen that the addition of fibre would result in increase of the Mechanical Properties of concrete.

  2. The optimum dosage of Steel Fibre was found to be 1.5% by volume of concrete.

  3. The optimum dosage of Polypropylene was found to be 0.3% by volume of concrete.

  4. In the case of Polypropylene added concrete it was observed that beyond 0.3% , when it was added it resulted in the honey combing of the specimens. This

REFERENCES

  1. Mr. Nikhil A. Gadge and Prof. S. S. Vidhale(2013) : Mix Design of Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) Using Slag & Steel Fiber, International Journal of Modern Engineering Research,vol3,pp3863-3871

  2. M. Adams Joe and A. Maria Rajesh (2013): An Experimental Investigation on the Effect of Ggbs& Steel Fibre in High Performance Concrete, International Journal of Computational Engineering Research,Vol-4,Issue 4.

  3. D.Neeraja (2013): Experimental investigations on strength characteristics of steel fibre reinforced Concrete, International Journal of Scientific & Engineering Research Volume 4, Issue 2.

  4. H. Gokulram and R. Anuradha(2013): Strength Studies on Polypropylene Fibre Reinforced Geopolymer Concrete using M- Sand, International Journal of Emerging Trends in Engineering and Development, Issue 3, Vol.2.

  5. BirukHailu and AbebeDinku(2013): Application of sugarcane bagasse ash as a partial cement replacement material. International Journal of Emerging Trends in Engineering and Development, Issue 3, Vol.2

  6. RafatSiddique,KushalKapoor(2012):Effect of polyester fibres on the compressive strength and abrasion resistance of HVFA concrete.Construction and Building Materials. Volume 29, April 2012, Pages 270-278

  7. Panda Mahabir, Biswal Kishore Chandra (2012):Effect of Synthetic Fibres on Concrete with GGBFS ReplacedCement.International Journal of Scientific & Engineering Research, Volume 4, Issue 2.

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