Impact of Covid19 on Education System

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Impact of Covid19 on Education System

Ashish Kumar

Founder, Tutela

Abstract : The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the educational system worldwide, leading to the near- total closures of schools, universities and colleges. Most governments around the world decide to have temporarily closed educational institutions in an attempt to reduce the spread of COVID19. The primary purpose of the intended paper is to highlight the impact of COVID 19 pandemic on the global education system. The paper will also provide an analytic description of the student experience and lessons learnt from the impact of the pandemic on the changing teaching and learning landscape, and the diffusion and adoption of e- learning in teacher education among few countries like India, United States Of America, Dubai, Bangladesh and Indonesia. School closures impact not only students, teachers, and families, But have far-reaching economic and societal consequences. In response to school closures, UNESCO recommended the use of distance learning programmes and open educational applications and platforms that schools and teachers can use to reach learners remotely and limit the disruption of education.

Keywords: Covid19, Education system, Pandemic

INTRODUCTION :

The global impact of Covid-19 is multifaceted and is clearly manifested in almost all sectors, particularly the health, economic and education sectors. Since the announcement of the virus as a pandemic in March 2020, there have been a plethora of daily reports on its impact on the lives of millions across the world. These nationwide closures are affecting over 91% of the universes pupil populace. A number of different international locations have applied localized closures affecting an enormous variety of further learners. UNESCO is supporting international locations in their efforts to mitigate the quick impact of faculty closures, particularly for extra weak and deprived communities, and to facilitate the coherence of training for all via distant studying. The UNESCO report estimates that the Covid pandemic will adversely have an effect on over 290 million college students throughout 22 international locations. The UNESCO estimates that round 32 crores college students are affected in India, incorporating these in faculties and faculties. Digital learning has quite a few benefits in itself like digital learning has no physical boundaries, it has more learning engagement expertise relatively than the traditional studying, additionally it is savvy and college students get to be taught within the confines of their normal variety of familiarity. However, digital learning is not without its restrictions and challenges, since face-to-face interplay is mostly perceived as the perfect sort of correspondence as in comparison with the relatively impersonalized nature of remote learning. Around the globe, on-line training has met with some success. In most of the countries, we even have far to go earlier than digital studying is seen as mainstream training, as a result of college students residing in

metropolitan space have the amenities to resolve on digital training, nevertheless, rustic space college students do not have the required infrastructure nor are monetarily strong to profit the sources required for digital training. The construction of the digital education infrastructure by the Government presently seems to be troublesome as a consequence of absence of price range. Additionally, even when the digital infrastructure is fabricated, making ready has to be given to the lecturers to make use of the digital system to offer genuine and correct, uninterrupted and seamless training to the scholars. Remote learning more and more depends on the dependable energy flexibly and common Web connectivity which can be a fantastical factor for Tier 2 and Tier 3 cities of every country.

Fig1: Impact of Covid19 on Education sector

India : COVID-19 has had a huge impact on the education sector of India. Although it has created a lot of challenges, different Opportunities have also evolved. The Government of India. And the different one Stakeholders of education explored the possibility of Open and Distance Learning (ODL) by adopting different approaches to Digital technologies to deal with the current crisis COVID-19.

India is not fully equipped to provide education to all corners of the nation via digital platforms. This is the Students who are not privileged, like the others, will suffer from it.

The United States Of America : SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19, is totally new. As such, the learning curve was steep (and still is) and provided an ideal environment for those seeking to spread disinformation. Early on, there were no effective treatments for the virus, partly due to high death tolls in New York, New Jersey and other northeastern states. The closure of schools, compounded by the associated public health and economic crises, poses major challenges for our students and their teachers. Our public

Countr ies

Number of Learners enrolled from pre-primary to upper secondary education

Number of learners enrolled in education programmes

Additional Information

India

286,376,216

34,337,594

On 16 March, India declared a countrywide lock- down of schools and colleges. On 19 March, the University Grants Commission asked universities to postpone exams until March 31. The board exams conducted by CBSE and ICSE

boards were postponed until March 31 at first and then later until July 1.

USA

25,017,635

1,625,578

E-learning has been promoted

Dubai

1,170,565

191,794

On March 3, the government announced that all private and public schools and colleges will close for four weeks from Sunday March 8 and the students will study at home for the second two weeks.Then on March the 30th, they announced that the e- learning programme will continue until the end of the year.

Bangla desh

36,786,304

3,150,539

Schools are closed.

Indones ia

60,228,569

8,037,218

Schools and universities are closed. Students study from home with online educational applications, such as Google Classroom. Minister of Education and Culture of Indonesia, Nadiem Makarim launched an educational TV block on TVRIand has prepared for the scenario to study online until the end of the year.

Countr ies

Number of Learners enrolled from pre-primary to upper secondary education

Number of learners enrolled in education programmes

Additional Information

India

286,376,216

34,337,594

On 16 March, India declared a countrywide lock- down of schools and colleges. On 19 March, the University Grants Commission asked universities to postpone exams until March 31. The board exams conducted by CBSE and ICSE

boards were postponed until March 31 at first and then later until July 1.

USA

25,017,635

1,625,578

E-learning has been promoted

Dubai

1,170,565

191,794

On March 3, the government announced that all private and public schools and colleges will close for four weeks from Sunday March 8 and the students will study at home for the second two weeks.Then on March the 30th, they announced that the e- learning programme will continue until the end of the year.

Bangla desh

36,786,304

3,150,539

Schools are closed.

Indones ia

60,228,569

8,037,218

Schools and universities are closed. Students study from home with online educational applications, such as Google Classroom. Minister of Education and Culture of Indonesia, Nadiem Makarim launched an educational TV block on TVRIand has prepared for the scenario to study online until the end of the year.

education system has not been built or prepared to cope with a situation like thiswe lack the structures to sustain effective teaching and learning during shutdown, and to provide the safety net support that many children receive in school.

Dubai : In response to COVID-19 health and safety risks, 191 national governments closed their schools by mid-April 2020. (McKinsey & Company, April 2020). The challenges that this response poses to school systems, students, parents, teachers and administrators are unprecedented. Early research shows that students are unequally affected by the current situation, depending on social factors. For example, before the pandemic, online platforms had already been implemented in 60 per cent of private and 37 per cent of state schools in affluent UK areas, but only in 23 per cent of schools in underprivileged areas (Sutton Trust, Apr'20).

Bangladesh : There are currently 133 public and private universities in Bangladesh. If all universities, immediately after these quarantine days are over, try to come up with their own educational software systems, it will be time- consuming, as it requires a huge investment and an expert workforce.Therefore, if we are able to create educational software under the patronage of the Government, the Ministry of Education, the Education Specialists, the ELearning Experts and the University Grand Commission (UGC), then all universities will be on a single platform linked to the respective university websites.

Roles and Responsibility

During the COVID-19 situation across these countries, we adopted the reporting structure of the Emergency Response Protocol, including the National Controller (Chief Executive) and the Executive Branch, as outlined below.

Fig : Structure of National Committee

UNESCO figures refer to students enrolled at the pre- primary, primary, secondary and upper-secondary levels of education as well as at the tertiary level. 1,379,344,914 students, or 80% of the world's learners, are now being kept out of educational institutions by country-wide closures. In some ways, another 284 million learners are affected by localised closures, Like those seen in U.S. states like California and Virginia. 138 governments have now ordered the country-wide closure of their schools and universities.

Projection : Some ways the pandemic has transformed the education sector across the world:

  1. A wide range of distance learning tools

    As soon as the pandemic struck, one of the key priorities for schools became to ensure learning continuity for the students. During this time, many schools shifted online using tools such as Google Meet, Microsoft Meeting etc. to ensure that the classes could continue without disruption. In areas with limited internet connectivity, local governments launched radio and television programs, together with the distribution of print materials to ensure uninterrupted learning.

  2. New methods of assessment with learning management software

    While many schools closed or canceled exams, many institutes also opted for alternative modalities, such as online testing and exams. In online testing, the students progress is monitored with the help of learning management systems and apps. This ensures rapid learning assessments and helps to identify learning gaps faster than the traditional methods.

  3. Development of new tools and resources to promote inclusive learning

    As countries adopted distance learning practices, students with disabilities faced and struggled with many barriers. This prompted many organizations to innovate and develop tools and technological resources for learners with disabilities and their parents. This included enhancing accessibility features, such as audio narration, sign language video, and simplified text to ensure that learners with disabilities could continue their studies.

  4. Online appreciation for teachers and educators

    As students continued to struggle to learn from home, across the world, there was an outpouring of parents gratitude for teachers, their skills, and their invaluable role in student well-being. Traditionally, the teachers role in the students life was rarely recognized. The pandemic forced society at large to recognize that schools and teachers play an important role in the students academic life, helping them form bonds with their peers, build confidence and help them fulfill hopes and dreams.

  5. The changing role of parents in education

    For decades parents played the role of mere spectators in the education of students. However, the pandemic has forced many parents to take a more active role in the education of their students. Whether it is supervising the students during online classes or simply homeschooling the students, the pandemic has made parents and teachers allies as they work together to meet the students pedological goals.

    Fig : Number of Children affected by school closure

    National school closures due to COVID-19 occurred at a time when a very large number of schools had already been closed for several months due to serious insecurity, strikes or climatic hazards. COVID-19 is worsening the education situation in USA and nearby states, where 47% of the world's 258 million out-of-school children live before the pandemic (30% due to conflict and emergency) The Covid-19 pandemic has had a major impact on education both positive as well as negative.

    But these changes have also highlighted the promising future of learning. Today, the need of the hour is to accelerate changes in modes of delivering quality education, through the use of digital resources such as learning management software. However, it is also imperative that children and youth be affected by a lack of resources or enabling the environment not to be left behind and get access to learning. Another key learning is the need to give the teaching profession better training in new methods of education delivery, as well as support. These implications will have lasting effects on educators, children, youth, and societies as a whole.

    The Covid-19 pandemic has had a serious impact on education both positive also as negative. But these changes have also highlighted the promising way forward for learning. Today, the necessity of the hour is to accelerate changes in modes of delivering quality education, through the utilization of digital resources like learning management software. However, it's also imperative that children and youth suffer from a scarcity of resources or enabling the environment to not be left behind and obtain access to learning. Another key learning is that the got to give the teaching profession better training in new methods of education delivery, also as support. Last but not least, we must not forget that the COVID-19 crisis and therefore the unparalleled education disruption is way from over.

    Negative impact of COVID-19 on education Education sector has suffeed a lot due to the outbreak of COVID-19. It has created many negative impacts on education and some of them are as pointed below: Educational activity hampered: Classes have been suspended and exams at different levels postponed. Different boards have already postponed the annual examinations and entrance tests. Admission process got delayed. Due to continuity in lockdown, students suffered a loss of nearly 3 months of the full academic year of 2020- 21 which is going to further deteriorate the situation of

    continuity in education and the students would face much difficulty in resuming schooling again after a huge gap.

    known and kept at the top of the agenda throughout the pandemic.

    Impact on employment: Most of the recruitment got postponed due to COVID-19 Placements for students may also be affected with companies delaying the on board of students. Unemployment rate is expected to be increased due to this pandemic. In most of the countries, there is no recruitment in Govt. sector and fresh graduates fear withdrawal of their job offers from private sectors because of the current situation. The Centre for Monitoring Worldwide Economys estimates on unemployment shot up from 8.4% in mid-March to 23% in early April and the urban unemployment rate to 30.9%. When the unemployment increases then the education gradually decreases as people struggle for food rather than education.

    Unprepared teachers/students for online education- Not all teachers/students are good at it or at least not all of them were ready for this sudden transition from face to face learning to online learning. Most of the teachers are just conducting lectures on video platforms such as Zoom, Google meet etc. which may not be real online learning without any dedicated online learning platform.

    Reduced global employment opportunity- Some may lose their jobs from other countries and the pass out students may not get their job Overseas due to restrictions caused by COVID-19. Workers might have returned home after losing their jobs overseas due to COVID-19. Hence, the fresh students who are likely to enter the job market shortly may face difficulty in getting suitable employment. Many students who have already got jobs through campus interviews may not be able to join their jobs due to lockdown. Employees who have been doing their jobs abroad may lose their jobs.

    Conclusion : The world has been affected by the COVID- 19 pandemic in various ways. The lack of information, the need for accurate information and the speed with which it is disseminated are important, as this pandemic requires the cooperation of entire populations. The rapid survey we conducted had a good response, and we show that health professionals and the general public were well informed about this.They are aware of the measures needed to reduce the spread of the disease. The knowledge present enables the authors to speculate that the lockdown would be effective in five major countries. Due to continuity in lockdown, students suffered a loss of nearly 3 months of the full academic year of 2020-21 which is going to further deteriorate the situation of continuity in education. On April20, the Economic Policy Institute estimated that at least $500 billion in additional assistance to State, Local, Tribal and Territorial (SLTT) governments would be needed by the end of 2021 to prevent budget cuts that would reduce SLTT governments capacity to offset pandemic impacts on their citizens. Public awareness is quite high and it is important that knowledge of communication channels is

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My name is Ashish Kumar, and I am a director at Tutela Education Pvt. Limited. I am an entrepreneur and a mentor at heart. I graduated from Jamia Millia Islamia University in 2015 with a Bachelor's Degree in Electronics and Communication.

I took an unconventional step towards international education during my last years of graduation and made it my goal to make a perfect place for students aspiring and preparing to study abroad. I enjoy imparting everything I know to the students at Tutela. I am very passionate about my work and I love what I do because it keeps me surrounded by so many young minds. I am ambitious and driven as I thrive on challenges and constantly set goals for myself. I am results-oriented, constantly checking in with the goal to determine how far I have brought the education w. my initiative or what will it take to make it happen. I, along with my team, have been helping students across the globe with test-prep assistance and international curriculums for 9-10 odd years. Seeing students overcome their academic hurdles impels me to outdo my previous efforts. It is a treat to see the students I mentor with my team go to Ivy Leagues, and make a bright future for themselves. I am tech-savvy and I spend/devote my spare time exploring new areas of personal and professional growth. I also enjoy socializing with people with good food and music.

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