Genration of Energy from Rooftop Airflow Ventilator


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Genration of Energy from Rooftop Airflow Ventilator

V. Suresh Kumar

A.P/EEE

Department of EEE K.Ramakrishnan College of Technology.

1.A. Abdul Washim 2.P. Balachandhar

3.M. Ahamed Ali 4.S. Lankesh

Department of EEE K.Ramakrishnan College of Technology

INTRODUCTION:

In upcoming years the generation of non-renewable energy may get reduce in terms of non- renewable resource availability. The only option is to use renewable energy instead non-renewable energy. The main concept is generate the power from roof top turbine. The roof top turbine is works with wind flow. Earlier we used renewable as a solar panel ,windmill and using more technology. In addition the energy is developed from roof top turbine. To avoid this problem and save the energy we have proposed the new methodology called GENERATION OF ENERGY FROM ROOFTOP AIRFLOW VENTILAT0R for

generating the power using renewable source wind Abstract:

The testing apparatus was conducted with wind speeds from 0-

14.0 m/s, incremented by 0.2 m/s each iteration, where the test results show that the rooftop ventilator self-starts at a wind speed of 0.4 m/s and minimal charged speed was recorded at 28.3 RPM at a voltage of 7.82 VDC (activated charging voltage via battery bank of two 12 V, 1.5Ain parallel connection) at 44.36 RPM. Then, it reaches ceiling voltage of 13.2 VDC and 0.56 ADC at turning approximately 56 RPM in which it produces 10.24watts power. At cut- out speed of 14.0 m/s and also rated output speed, the RTV optimizes the turning at 95.6 RPM while generating

1.3 ADC, in which it produces a maximum power output of 26 watts. For the modes of finance; ROI remarks at 6.21, payback period at

4.03 years, and cost per kWh is as low as 1.28 rupees/kWh, assuming operating at average speed of 14.0 m/s all year long.

OBJECTIVE:

  • To generate the power from rooftop ventilation, their by charging the battery and supply power to applications.

  • To introduce the charging technology from

    rooftop turbine ventilation which is mainly used industrial

    lighting without any external supply.

  • To run the generator from natural air through

rotating rooftop turbine to obtain the electrical energy.

BACKGROUND KNOWLEDGE:

With various research and development being focused on, these must be coupled along with current wind generation situation in country. First, the countrys average wind speed is under 7 m/s, whereas current installed HAWT capacity operates at beyond 8 m/s

.Secondly, wind intermittent resource in country causes HAWT to be unable to reach its designated performance and barely generate electricity for some hours in a year.

As Mertens remarks on alternative to produce wind energy close to points of uses .Bhutta et al. suggest VAWT can be economical viable for remote zones away from grid transmission lines. Allen et al. remark that micro- generation is a solution to transmission and distribution losses . And Mithraratne suggests that distributed

micro-generation systems can provide generation at the point of uses and lower major investments for grid transmissions . Westerholm recommends power storage and distribution systems to provide wind power on demand for economic benefit, particularly in the absence of wind . Even that, Khan et al. illustrate the use of motor-driven to keep rooftop ventilator rotating in the absence of wind.

respond to wind perturbations Fernandes et al. site that it is downtime of wind turbines gearbox failures that present a problem, this causes excessive repair and adds up operational costs. Since, main causes of power loss in the gearbox indicate rotational friction loss in the gearing and bearing mechanisms. To minimize that friction loss is to simplify the design of the direct- drive rotor. This may be improved by low friction and torque properties from magnetic bearing .

Therefore, for the design of the turbine rotor, as to enable and prolong the turbine to turning as much hours for all year long. Nayar et al. point out that an ability to extract more power, is an ability to

DESIGN:

:

CONFIGURATION AND TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS:

Configurations

Specifications

Full-Scale Prototype

Rooftop airflow ventilator

Type

VAWT / Air-Flow out Ventilator

Generator Output

24v DC

Generator Type

PMSG (DC)

Diameter of Turbine

24 inch (610 mm.)

Height

480 mm. (w/o rooftop stand)

Materials

Aluminum / Zinc / Steel

Turbine Spoke

6 spokes

Total Weight

6,600 g.

Operating Life

25 years

Maintenance

Maintenance-free

Start-up Wind Speed

(also cut-in wind speed)

0.4 m/s.

Cut-out Wind Speed

(also rated output speed)

14.0 m/s.

Operational Range

0.4-14.0 m/s.

Minimal Charged Speed

7.8 m/s.

Minimal Charged Turbine Speed

28.3 RPM

Rated Voltage (charged)

12 VDC

Battery Bank

12 Volts 1.5 A.

Configurations

Specifications

Full-Scale Prototype

Rooftop airflow ventilator

Type

VAWT / Air-Flow out Ventilator

Generator Output

24v DC

Generator Type

PMSG (DC)

Diameter of Turbine

24 inch (610 mm.)

Height

480 mm. (w/o rooftop stand)

Materials

Aluminum / Zinc / Steel

Turbine Spoke

6 spokes

Total Weight

6,600 g.

Operating Life

25 years

Maintenance

Maintenance-free

Start-up Wind Speed

(also cut-in wind speed)

0.4 m/s.

Cut-out Wind Speed

(also rated output speed)

14.0 m/s.

Operational Range

0.4-14.0 m/s.

Minimal Charged Speed

7.8 m/s.

Minimal Charged Turbine Speed

28.3 RPM

Rated Voltage (charged)

12 VDC

Battery Bank

12 Volts 1.5 A.

Configurations

Specifications

Turbine Body

Aluminum39 airfoil curved- vanes

Turbine Spoke

6 spokes (steel)

Turbine Lid

Zinc

Net Weight

2,500 g.

Turbine Base

Zinc

Internal Frame

Corrosion-resistant steel

Base Arm

3 arms (steel)

Net Weight

4,100 g.

Turbine Rotor

Corrosion-resistant steel

Length

135 mm.

Outer Race Diameter

15 mm.

Turbine Stator

Corrosion-resistant steel

Width (thickness)

40 mm.

Outer Race Diameter

170 mm.

Output Controller

Charging Controller (for solar PV)

Turbine Cost (unit cost)

8,000 rupess exclude battery bank system

Variable-Speed

12-24v dc

Configurations

Specifications

Turbine Body

Aluminum39 airfoil curved- vanes

Turbine Spoke

6 spokes (steel)

Turbine Lid

Zinc

Net Weight

2,500 g.

Turbine Base

Zinc

Internal Frame

Corrosion-resistant steel

Base Arm

3 arms (steel)

Net Weight

4,100 g.

Turbine Rotor

Corrosion-resistant steel

Length

135 mm.

Outer Race Diameter

15 mm.

Turbine Stator

Corrosion-resistant steel

Width (thickness)

40 mm.

Outer Race Diameter

170 mm.

Output Controller

Charging Controller (for solar PV)

Turbine Cost (unit cost)

8,000 rupess exclude battery bank system

Variable-Speed

12-24v dc

PROCEDURE FOR TESTING:

The testing procedure is an experimental procedure based on power output profile, so as to find starting-up speed, cut-in speed, rated output speed, and cut-out speed. The testing rig was then arranged for measuring variable wind speeds. The RTV was mounted on top of a rooftop stand whereas it was positioned directly in front of an air outlet (diameter:

1.00 m., area: 0.785 m2) with a variable-speed industrial fan . An adjustable rack of anemometer(s) and digital photo tachometer were positioned in front of the air outlet to measure the wind speed in m/s and revolution per minutes (RPM). Also, digital voltmeter and ammeter were connected to the testing rig. Then, wind speed iterations were run and measured each time, in which was incremented by 0.2 m/s. Noting that for finding initial starting-up speed, by gradually started wind speed from 0 m/s for several trials until the RTV starting to actuate and the average of wind speeds was recorded.

Four readings parameters were measured

using; anemometer(s), digital tachometer, and digital voltmeter and ammeter. The first two parameters were carefully taken at the very front of the RTV position and the latter were taken at a spot output location of buck-boost converter .The adjustable rack of anemometer(s) was attached very close in front of the air outlet. This aims to minimize error from wind decreasing velocity. The tachometer was placed close to its reflective tape attached on the rim of the turbine body so as to compute the RPM. Then, parameters obtained each iteration from 0 until 14.0 m/s (0 – 71 iterations) were calculated.

This must be noted that, the testing rig was prepped and tested inside the laboratory with no site monitoring in the outdoor. Then, a preliminary error analysis was made neglecting of turbulence flow or air lifting-flow under rooftop stand. And assume laminar air- flow velocity and slightest amount of wind directional change in the laboratory. Also, assuming average atmospheric ambient air density of

1.22 kg/m3 , and ambient temperature was recorded at 32°C.. This expected error was being taken care of by running several trials of wind speed before obtaining the average readings each time.

In addition to that, the wind generation system was constructed primarily to contribute to this case study as the RTV (and rooftop stand) are mounted on top of this system . This system is accountable only an electrical discharging part, in which the system consists of buck- boost converter, a charging controller (for solar PV), battery bank of 12 Volt 1.5 A, pieces of equipment through a household light panel .

In principle, the power flow is converted from wind kinetic energy into the PMSG (24V 1.5A) as of direct current (DC) and then fed into the charging controller. Then, the DC current was obtained from this point as to calculate actual power output.

CONCLUSION:

This case study re-designed, constructed and tested the RTV prototype based on wind turbine power output profile. The RTV mechanical characteristic shows a low self-starting speed of 0-14.0 m/s, incremented by 0.2 m/s each iteration, where the test results show that the rooftop ventilator self-starts at a wind speed of 0.4 m/s and minimal charged speed was recorded at 28.3 RPM at a voltage of 7.82 VDC (activated charging voltage via battery bank of two 12 V, 1.5Ain parallel connection) at

44.36 RPM. Then, it reaches ceiling voltage of 13.2 VDC and 0.56 ADC at turning approximately 56 RPM in which it produces 10.24watts power. At cut-out speed of 14.0 m/s and also rated output speed, the RTV optimizes the turning at 95.6 RPM while generating 1.3 ADC, in which it produces a maximum power output of 26 watts.

This concludes that the RTV may still be insufficient in term of the power output at the low- speed wind ranging from 0.4-4.0 m/s. However, from 4.0-8.0 m/s range, the RTV can trigger stabilized charging level at 7.8 m/s easily while producing approximately 3.38 watts at turbine turning 44.36 RPM. And from8.0-

    1. m/s, the RTV reached out its full performance with the modes of finance; ROI remarks at 6.21, payback period at 4.03 years, and cost per kWh is as low as 1.28 rupees/kWh, assuming operating at average speed of 14.0 m/s all year long.

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